April 4th, 2014

Dear Residents,

The HPHA’48 strives to improve Hancock Park’s quality of life and promote a sense of community. Please support our efforts by becoming an annual dues paying member. To serve as a member of the HPHA Board of Directors or to vote, dues must be paid on or before June 30th annually. Our suggested donation is $25.00, but any amount is appreciated! You can now donate ON LINE! Go to HancockPark.org and click on DONATE. You can use PayPal (if you have an account) or any major credit card. Please be sure we have your correct email and home address!

The Hancock Park Homeowners Association ‘48:
Helps organize block security meetings for our residents with Block Captains, LAPD and our private security companies to improve awareness and neighborhood safety. We communicate on a regular basis with these organizations and neighbors.


Created a Streets Committee, made up of Board members and residents, to focus on ensuring CD4 and the City will fix our failed streets. Watch for an updated neighborhood survey with additional options and more information on how to repair our streets. Our Council Office has promised that 6th Street and Highland will be resurfaced this year.


Created a Highland Avenue Median Committee, made up of Board members and residents, which succeeded in restoring the historic median by funding the trimming of all 75 palms, securing funding to repair the irrigation system and providing oversight along with Urban Forestry for proper median maintenance. We are also planning the replacement of 20 missing palms this year.

Succeeded in trimming over 150 parkway trees, removing over 30 tree stumps, planting over 80 new parkway trees, purchasing and nurturing 2 dozen baby elm trees for future elm replacement, and continues to replace and maintain our parkway trees to preserve our beautiful canopy.


Maintains an extensive neighborhood email list which is used to communicate important information to our residents, including safety and security updates, traffic and transportation information and City, Council District 4 and Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council updates, and which has reunited dozens of pets with their happy owners!

Thank you for your support!

Cindy Chvatal-Keane

President

HPHA’48

March 13th, 2014

Association Committees and How Your Can Help

The Hancock Park Home Owners Association ’48 Committees:

  • Block Captains
  • Neighborhood Watch/Emergency Prep
  • Filming
  • Graffiti
  • HPOZ
  • Land Use and Zoning
  • Parking
  • School Liaison
  • Security
  • Street Resurfacing/Repair
  • Traffic
  • Parkway Tree

The success of our committees rely on the work the members!  We are always looking for new committee members.  If an area interests you, contact the Association and join a committee!

Don’t forget to look at the beautification work done by the Schools Committee at John Burroughs Middle School and Third Street School.  Joanne Medeiros and Patricia Alexander have done a terrific job of keeping the landscaping beautiful and the schools grounds clean.

Bringing in your trash cans on the day of trash pickup not only helps the neighborhood looks good, but keeps us safe.  Trash cans left out are a signal that the resident is not at home.  Also, remember to:  lock your windows and doors, don’t leave visible electronics in your car, never open your door to a stranger.  Officer Art Gallegos, our acting Sr. Lead Offier’ss cell phone number is 213-793-0708 and his email address is:  35849@lapd.lacity.org .    Remember to never confront a suspicious person, always call 911.

Report street light outages to the city at:  http://bsl.lacity.org/.  Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at:  http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ orhttp://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org).   Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org .  Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System - http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

March 13th, 2014

February 2014

Be Sure and Complete the Survey

If you haven’t already please respond to the Street Survey which asks residents to vote on one of three options for fixing our streets:  1) Asphalt Resurfacing; 2) Concrete Street Replacement, which would mean homeowners assessments; and 3) No Major Repairs.  While the original streets in Hancock Park were concrete; the developer paid for the installation, not the City.  The City will repave our streets, but they will only do it in asphalt.  To resurface our streets in concrete will take the formation of a special assessment district where Hancock Park residents will tax themselves to raise the additional funds to install concrete.  If you haven’t gotten a letter and survey in the mail please contact the Association.

The Highland Median has been trimmed!  Drive by and see how it looks.  After strong questioning from the Association the City has committed to improving the monitoring of maintenance on the median.  The Association is also continuing to use your dues to pay for beautification efforts in Hancock Park.  Eight tree stumps have been removed and trees will be planted to replace them as soon as the weather cools.

Security continues to be a concern so remember to:  lock your windows and doors, don’t leave visible electronics in your car, never open your door to a stranger.  If you observe suspicious activity call the LAPD’s non-emergency dispatch number:  877-ASK-LAPD. Our Senior Lead Officer (SLO), Dave Cordova, is out on medical leave.  Officer Art Gallegos will be covering for Dave.  His cell phone number is 213-793-0708 and his email address is:  35849@lapd.lacity.org .    Remember to never confront a suspicious person, always call 911.

Report street light outages to the city at:  http://bsl.lacity.org/.  Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at:  http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ orhttp://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org).   Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org .  Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System - http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

March 13th, 2014

Repairing Our Streets – Options to Think About

We wish everyone a Happy, and Successful New Year! There are lots of things we’ll be working on for Hancock Park in 2014, and invite you to join us.

The Hancock Park Streets Committee has put together a survey for Hancock Park residents asking them to vote on one of three options for finally fixing our streets. Option 1 is Asphalt Resurfacing; Option 2 is Concrete Street Replacement; and Option 3 is No Major repairs.

The original streets in Hancock Park were concrete. While the City will repave our streets, they will only do it in asphalt. To resurface our streets in concrete will take the formation of a special assessment district Hancock Park residents will tax themselves to raise the additional funds to install concrete. The survey will be sent to all Hancock Park homeowners enclosed with a self-addressed postage paid response card. We ask everyone in Hancock Park to read the options carefully, vote and send their card in by February 1st, 2014.

There has been a number of home and car break-ins so sure to lock your windows and doors, don’t leave visible electronics in your car, never open your door to a stranger. If you observe suspicious activity call Wilshire Police Desk 213-473-0476. You can also call our Senior Lead Officer (SLO) Dave Cordova- cell phone at 213-793-0650 and notify your private security patrol cars. Never confront a suspicious person, always call 911.

The Association will be holding our Annual Hancock Park Block Captain meeting in January. Additional information on the time and place will be announced in December.

Report street light outages to the city at: http://bsl.lacity.org/. Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ orhttp://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

December 6th, 2013

Looking Forward to 2014

The HPHOA’48 has formed two new Ad Hoc committees: Hancock Park Streets and Highland Avenue Median.
The residents will finally begin to see results of those efforts of the Median Committee in Early January. The Median, which was, designated a Los Angeles Historic Landmark #94 in 1972 had been ignored for years. It was not for lack of trying to get the City to help. We could not figure out why brand new medians were being funded (via special grants) and we couldn’t get our sprinklers fixed, our turf fertilized, re seeded or mowed on a regular basis. It just didn’t make any sense. The HPHOA funds Parkway Tree trimming, replanting of new trees and stump removal, along with helping to fund beautification projects at local schools. The City no longer funds any of these services. Last month CD5, which represents 40% of the median on the west side, joined the effort and contributed 15K toward needed repairs along with the 15K from CD4. The repair money was allocated from each of the Council Offices discretionary funds made available via AB 1290. The median committee, made up of Highland Ave. residents and HPHOA Board members, is also working with representatives of the Department of Urban Forestry, to ensure that Tru Green, the landscape maintenance company the City has contracted with, actually maintains the median and complies with the contract. Along with bi-monthly turf mowing the company is responsible for; irrigation repair, trash removal, sign removal. yearly fertilization, thatching, and re seeding. The HPHOA’48 plans to replace the missing palms along the median and the committee is exploring drought tolerant landscaping ideas.
The Hancock Park Streets Committee will work with the Association and the City to develop accurate and complete information about options for repaving our Hancock Park streets; the committee will be responsible for developing a survey of all Hancock Park residents and will work to reach a consensus on an option. At this time options include an assessment district to pay for repaving in concrete or a switch to asphalt re paving. Hancock Park streets have long been neglected by the City, in a recent LA Time article, Hancock Park was singled out as having some of the worst streets in the City. See link: http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/04/local/la-me-pavement-201305. The Association has been trying to get our Council Office to focus on this problem for several years. While we will continue to work to improve the condition of our streets. We will be addressing another issue – our horrific potholes. As we try to develop a plan for repaving, we are asking the City to repair our potholes in a professional lasting manner. We are hopeful with the formation of the new committees and the continued follow up of the HPHOA board, the City will finally address the needs of the Hancock Park community. Please write to our Councilman Tom La Bonge to encourage him to focus on these important issues, his email address is Tom.LaBonge @lacity.org.

July 23rd, 2013

Rudolph Gintel
Rudy has lived in Hancock Park for many years and has served as the liaison with the Wilshire Homeowners Alliance, helping coordinate larger community efforts with Hancock Park. He has also served for 5 years as business representative to the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council and is a past member of its Land Use Committee.

Greg Glasser
Greg has lived in Hancock Park since 1999. He has been involved with the HPOZ and chaired the HPOZ Committee. He maintains the Association’s website – hancockpark.org.
Sheldon Goodkind
Sheldon is a longtime resident of Hancock Park. He is a co-chair of the Schools Committee and has worked closely with the neighbors and the schools to successfully address many of the longtime problems, such as parking and traffic.
Peter Gorelick
Peter grew up in Hancock Park and attended local schools including John Burroughs, Fairfax High and UCLA. Peter moved back to Hancock Park in 2003. He is an insurance defense/workers’ compensation attorney. Peter represents Hancock Park as a member of the Wilshire Community Police Advisory Board. He is also an LAPD Volunteer and graduate of the LAPD Community Police Academy.
Susan Grossman
Susan and her husband Kim have lived in Hancock Park for more than 20 years. She is currently the vice president of the Association, chair of the Tree Committee as well as an HPOZ Board member.

Cami Taylor
Cami has lived in Hancock Park at 264 South Muirfield for 13 years. She’s married to Steve Eshelman and has a daughter, Marguerite Eshelman. She is a member of the Ebell and the LATC. Cami owns a film production company called Crossroads Films, which produces commercials, music videos, independent features and some television programming. She is the ex-president and still sits on the board of a nonprofit organization called Streetlights and is a board member of a commercial producers’ group called the AICP. Cami was also a founding member of the HPOZ support group and an integral part of the many year efforts to achieve HPOZ status for Hancock Park.

Ben Thompson
Ben Thompson has been a resident of Hancock Park for over 20 years. He earned an A.B. from Brown University and an M.B.A. from USC. In addition to being past president, current Board member of the Association, and head of the Budget Committee, he is founder of the Wilshire Traffic Committee and a member of the Board of Trustees of the Oaks School in Hollywood.
Jon Vein
The Association welcomes new board member Jon Vein, a long-time resident of Hancock Park. He is co-founder and CEO of MarketShare, a leading data analytics software company and before founding MarketShare worked as COO for Michael Ovitz’s AMG and APG. Jon is an Emmy Award winner, producing many film and television productions, including King of the Hill and the Simpsons. He was trained in engineering and computer science at UC Berkeley before attending Harvard law school; after which he was a founding partner of the entertainment law firm Dem & Vein. Jon is an active volunteer in many civic and charitable organizations. Jon is married to Ellen Goldsmith-Vein, an entertainment executive, and has two rambunctious children, Caroline and Jack.
James Wolf

Jim grew up in Hancock Park. After time away in college, he, his wife and children moved back to Hancock Park and have lived here since 1983. Jim attended both the University of Pennsylvania and USC where he earned degrees in Civil Engineering and in Architecture. He is a California licensed architect. Jim has served on the Board of Directors since 1987 and was the president of the Association for over 12 years. Jim co-chairs the Street Lighting Committee and the Zoning Committee. He is the Hancock Park representative on the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council where he is vice president of the Board and chairman of the Land Use and Planning Committee.

July 23rd, 2013

Welcome Our New Board Member

The Association welcomes new board member Jon Vein, a long-time resident of Hancock Park. He is co-founder and CEO of MarketShare, a leading data analytics software company and before founding MarketShare worked as COO for Michael Ovitz’s AMG and APG. Jon is an Emmy Award winner, producing many film and television productions, including King of the Hill and the Simpsons. He was trained in engineering and computer science at UC Berkeley before attending Harvard law school; after which he was a founding partner of the entertainment law firm Dem & Vein. Jon is an active volunteer in many civic and charitable organizations. Jon is married to Ellen Goldsmith-Vein, an entertainment executive, and has two rambunctious children, Caroline and Jack.

The Association’s Tree Committee is planning its next Elm Tree planting and Tree Pruning. If you have questions or want a tree planted contact the Tree Committee via the Association’s website. And don’t forget to take of your parkway trees by Stakeing young trees; Watering, slow and deep; Mulching; Feeding and Pruning.
The Association continues to press the City to repave Hancock Park’s streets with the appropriate cement surfacing rather than patching with asphalt. Please report any potholes or pavement failures to the Association so we can keep our list up-to-date.

Remember if you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service. Remember: Never confront a suspicious person, call 911. Report street light outages to the city at: http://bsl.lacity.org/. Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

June 7th, 2013

Fix Our Hancock Park Streets

The Los Angeles Times article on LA’s deteriorating streets highlighted the state of many failing Los Angeles Streets. It is no surprise to Hancock Park residents that Hancock Park’s streets are the worst in the City. The Association Board along with residents have been working with the Council Office, Public Works and the Bureau of Street Maintenance on ideas for a permanent solution for repairing and resurfacing our streets. You can find the Los Angeles Times article and map at: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-pavement-20130505,0,4119436.story

The Association has paid to have 16 Elm trees on 4th Street professionally pruned. Drive by and take a look! Not only do the trees look great, but this pruning gives them an additional 5-10 years of life. Summer’s here so don’t forget to take care of your parkway trees by:

1. Stake young trees–They need help surviving winds and lawnmowers.
2. Watering, and be sure it’s slow, deep watering –
3. Mulching
4. Feeding
5. Pruning – The city rarely does pruning, usually just cutting down trees, so consult an arborist for recommendations.

Remember that crime is still a problem so if you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service. Remember: Never confront a suspicious person, call 911. Report street light outages to the city at: http://bsl.lacity.org/. Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

April 25th, 2013

Spring is Time to Take Care of Your Trees

Association Board Member Joel Kozberg has put together an instruction sheet for tree care, particularly useful for our stressed parkway trees. We haven’t had a lot of rain this winter and so parkway trees will need attention and regular watering to survive the summer. A copy of Joel’s tree facts can be found at the website, but the important highlights are:

1. Stake young trees–They need help surviving winds and lawnmowers.
2. Watering, and be sure it’s slow, deep watering –
• First months after planting– water once to twice per week
• From 4 to 12 months – water once every two or three weeks
• Years 2 and after for parkway trees – once every 4 to 6 weeks
3. Mulching – place a three or four inch layer of mulch around the tree, keeping about 2 inches around the trunk free of mulch.
4. Feeding – Sprinkle dry fertilizer lightly around the tree line (the area of the ground under the ends of the tree branches) and water it into the soil.
5. Pruning – The city rarely does pruning, and when it does it is often done poorly, so consult an arborist for recommendations.

The Association is continuing to press the City for a schedule for fixing our deteriorating streets. Members of the Traffic Committee drove around with a DOT representative to show them all the potholes. The Traffic Committee is also continuing to demand that the City include our neighborhood’s input on the proposed changes to the City’s Mobility Element. Some of these changes could mean loss of traffic lanes and parking spaces.

Remember that crime is still a problem so if you observe suspicious activity call 1-877-ASK-LAPD and notify your private security service. Remember: Never confront a suspicious person, call 911. Report street light outages to the city at: http://bsl.lacity.org/. Report potholes by submitting an online request at http://bss.lacity.org/request.htm. If you’re planning changes to your house read the Preservation Plan which can be found at: http://www.hancockparkhomeownersassociation.org/ or http://preservation.lacity.org/hpoz/la/hancock-park ) and contact City Planner Vinita Huang (213-978-1216 or Vinita.Huang@lacity.org). Be sure and look at our website for news – http://www.HancockPark.org . Report graffiti sightings by calling 311 or at the City’s Anti-Graffiti Request System – http://anti-graffiti.lacity.org/welcome.cfm?CFID=1007&CFTOKEN=411CDB4F-0FC3-4EE1-89DE58DCCB435538 and by calling Hollywood Beautification, 323-463-5180 Questions regarding filming – contact Filming Committee, Cami Taylor (323-692-1414-Home and 310-659-6220-Office).

April 25th, 2013

TREE CARE
The following is some general information regarding the care of trees. The mature trees in Hancock Park are an important amenity that beautify the neighborhood and increase property values. Unfortunately, some of the mature street trees have either succumbed to disease or have otherwise reached the end of their lives and have had to be replaced. Fortunately, we have a good program lead by the Hancock Park Homeowners Association that plants replacement trees. However, the planting of replacement trees is only the first step in the long process of tree maturation. Think children growing up to become adults. In order for the young replacement trees to grow into the mature trees that we all appreciate and value requires that the young trees receive care and attention. The trees will not flourish without your help. A relatively small investment of your time and money will produce dividends for you and the generations that will come after you. If you do not do what is required for your trees, no one else will – the City of Los Angeles does not take care of street trees. Please do your part. Thank you.

1. STAKING YOUNG TREES

A young tree develops a stronger trunk if it is unsupported and can sway in the wind. (the technical reason is that as the trunk moves in the breeze, it releases chemicals called cytokinins, which cause the cells in the trunk to enlarge and thicken, thereby strengthening the plant tissue.) However, trees that are container grown (almost certainly the type of young tree that is planted in parkways or gardens in Los Angeles) have been closely staked their entire existence and likely do not have the strength to stand alone without staking after replanting. Combine that with the potential for strong Santa Ana winds, and staking during the first six months or year is the prudent choice.

The tree should not be staked with a single stake immediately adjacent to the trunk – even though that may be the way the tree was staked in the nursery container. Beyond not giving the tree the motion it needs to strengthen, a stake driven immediately next to the trunk risks damaging the trunk and/or roots of the tree. Instead, two stakes should be used, placed on opposite sides of the trunk, each approximately 12-18 inches from the trunk (depending upon the size of the tree). Determine where to attach the ties by using your hand to find the place where support of the tree keeps it upright. Attach the ties about six inches above that point. Use soft ties that have broad smooth surfaces – available at nurseries. Leave some slack in the ties so that the tree can move about 2 inches in each direction – that will help strengthen the trunk. Do not use wire, rope or water hose filled with wire or rope – doing so can inhibit growth and girdle the trunk. Remove the stakes once the tree has sufficiently strengthened – approximately 6 months to one year after replanting.

2. WATERING

Trees benefit from deep and thorough watering – sprinkling with a hose for a few minutes does not provide adequate irrigation. Likewise, just watering the very top of the soil encourages root growth at the surface rather than deeper in the soil. The frequency of required watering is greatest for a newly planted tree and diminishes as the tree matures. The roots of a newly planted tree have been restricted to the area of the tree’s container – as the tree grows the roots will spread. The following are rough guidelines for a 15 gallon tree (the size of the container) receiving about 15 gallons of water at each watering (a larger tree will require proportionally more water):

First month – water twice per week
Months two and three – water once per week
Months four through seven – water once every two weeks
Months eight through twelve – water once every three to four weeks
Years two through five – once every four to six weeks
After five years, an established tree may only require infrequent irrigation.

The foregoing are guidelines and may have to be varied depending upon actual conditions, including soil type, weather, etc. Too much water can be as harmful as too little. Check the soil for moisture level at a depth of about four inches – if it is very wet, do not water. The growth of your tree will be greatly affected by it receiving adequate (but not too much) water.

3. MULCHING

Mulching around the base of a tree has multiple benefits: (1) mulch insulates the soil helping to provide a buffer from heat and cold temperatures; (2) mulch helps the soil retain water, reducing the amount needed for irrigation; (3) mulch keeps weeds and grass out to help prevent root competition; (4) mulch prevents soil compaction; and (5) mulch reduces damage to the tree trunk from lawnmowers, string trimmers or other gardening equipment.

Place a 3 – 4 inch layer of mulch around the tree. The mulch should be kept away from the trunk – at least two inches. The mulch can extend out as far as the drip-line of the tree – the outermost circumference of the tree’s canopy. However, recognizing that may be more mulch that you want, a circle or square area of mulch that stretches 2 feet from each side of the trunk will still be beneficial. Mulch is commercially available from a variety of sources, including home improvement stores. Wood or bark chips are good tree mulch and can provide a well-manicured appearance. Use chips that are approximately 1-3 inches in size.

4. FEEDING

Trees can benefit from feeding (fertilizing) – it will help stimulate growth and better establish the trees. However, a newly planted tree should not be fertilized for a couple of months to let it first get acclimated to its new location. Most of the root activity through which trees draw in nutrients occurs in the top 12 or so inches of the soil. Among the possible ways to feed a tree are dry fertilizer spread on the surface around the tree and liquid fertilizer injected into the soil. Dry fertilizer should be spread evenly over the entire root zone which can extend two to three times the width of the branches. Remember that some of the root zone may have already been fertilized when fertilizer was applied to the lawn or planting bed under or adjacent to the tree. Sprinkle the fertilizer on top of the soil or mulch and water lightly. Since the fertilizer will quickly move through the mulch there is no need to remove it or to place the fertilizer below it. Do not dump dry fertilizer in piles – doing so can cause the roots below the fertilizer to be burned and die. Liquid fertilizer can be injected into the soil using a root feeder – the Ross Deep Root Feeder is available online or at garden and home improvement stores. This is the link to the Home Depot: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ross-Root-Feeder-12044H/100328642#.UUjKHRdweSo It uses solid fertilizer tablets that are dissolved in water in the feeder and the liquid is injected through the feeder’s injector spike. In Los Angeles, trees can be fertilized once in the spring and once in the fall – the tree roots continue to grow in the winter, even if the leaves fall off or appear dormant. Trees can be overfed – more is not better. Too much feeding can result in too much growth that is weak. Consult with a qualified nursery regarding which fertilizer to use. Do not use so-called “weed and feed” fertilizers that incorporate a herbicide for weed control – the herbicide can harm your tree.

5. PRUNING

Young trees require proper pruning to achieve a strong structure and desirable form. Among other things, a tree that is not pruned is going to be more susceptible to damage from the wind or other elements. A tree that is not properly pruned when it is young will require more difficult and frequent corrective action as it matures. Generally, the goal of pruning is to establish a strong central trunk with sturdy, well placed branches. Meaningful pruning – beyond the removal of dead or damaged branches – should usually wait for a couple of years after planting to allow the tree to fully recover from the shock of transplanting. Proper pruning requires training and skill and often is better left to a professional. In the case of parkway trees, the city will not prune on a regular basis and the burden is upon the homeowner to ensure that the trees are properly cared for, including pruning.

6. THE RESULTS OF PROPER TREE CARE
The two trees depicted below were planted at the same time, in approximately 2006. The tree on the right has received regular tree care, including watering, feeding, mulching and pruning (it was pruned shortly before the photo was taken). The tree on the left essentially has been uncared for since it was planted. The difference between the trees is obvious. The tree that has received proper care has a larger trunk, is much taller and fuller and has a better form. In seven years it has become a handsome tree that helps beautify its street. The tree that has not been regularly cared for still looks like a recently planted tree and if it can recover from its neglect will take many more years to develop into a meaningful street tree like the one on the right.